Archive for January, 2010

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Links 01/26/2010

January 26, 2010
  • After careful consideration of the draft patent policy, Apple believes that it is essential to continued interoperability and development of the Web that fundamental W3C standards be available on a royalty-free basis. In line with the W3C’s mission to “lead the Web to its full potential,” Apple supports a W3C patent policy with an immutable commitment to royalty-free licensing for fundamental Web standards. Apple offers this statement in support of its position.

    tags: standards

  • The players from Google and Vimeo do present a pretty serious problem, though. Each of these require a proprietary H.264 codec to be able to view them. These codecs aren’t compatible with the royalty-free web standards that the rest of the web is built on. The fact that they are being so unabashedly hyped along with the new darling of the web – HTML5 – means that most people don’t understand that something very dangerous is taking place behind the scenes.

    tags: standards

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Links 01/22/2010

January 22, 2010
  • Social media data flow will likely be open and standardized soon, but not the social applications themselves, keeping the walled gardens up between social apps for the time being. The emergence of Facebook, Twitter, and the rest of the social Web as a global force in the last several years has done a great deal to highlight their potential to fundamentally alter the way we communicate and collaborate both at home and in business. However, despite the movement of social computing into our daily lives we’re all clearly on a long journey together as the technologies themselves emerge from infancy.

    tags: standards

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Links 01/17/2010

January 17, 2010
  • Last week I offered 5 New Year’s resolutions for closing deals in 2010. This week, I thought I’d have a little fun and address the issue of entrepreneurs’ frustration with lawyers. A recent tweet from Bram Cohen, the inventor of BitTorrent, captures this frustration well: “Lawyers are like phone companies. Their bread and butter is in tricking you into racking up minutes.”

    tags: standards, lawyers

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Links 01/09/2010

January 9, 2010
  • Earlier this week, I noted the fact that the 100 day mark for the CodePlex Foundation had passed (on December 19) without any comment from the Foundation on how they had fared against their aggressive goals for that time period, including the replacement of the founding, interim Board of Directors, with a permanent board. 

    tags: standards, codeplex

  • None of this – not elitism or regionalism or functionalism or informalism – is a panacea. Such collective action is invariably less inclusive, less comprehensive and less predictable than formal global accords. It can suffer from a lack of legitimacy. But it is doable and desirable, and can lead to or complement classic multilateralism. Multilateralism in the 21st century is, like the century itself, likely to be more fluid and, at times, messy than what we are used to.

    tags: standards

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Links 01/07/2010

January 7, 2010
  • In Linus Torvalds world (the guy who invented Linux) Open means that the software is developed through a community process. The source code is visible and modifiable by anyone and is available for free.

    This is called ‘Open Source’.

    Companies may package and bundle the software in new and novel ways, and provide support and services on top for a free.

    The problem with Open Source on the web is that the software itself has less value than the network effects and up-time provided by a branded, hosted experience. Running Twitter.com on open source software, for example, would have very little value because Twitter’s lock-in is not their software, but rather their name space (@chrissaad) and their developer ecosystem all developing software with dependencies on their proprietary API.

    Open Source is useful, interesting and important, but is not what I mean when I talk about the Open Web. I feel like its value is well understood and it is not the first, best way of making our world (and the Internet) a better place – at least not in the same way it once did when client-side software was the primary way we used computers.

    tags: open, standards

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Links 01/06/2010

January 6, 2010
  • However, when it comes to working with specifications produced in this fashion, there are a number of legal and IP barriers both for adoption and for engagement in formal standardisation that need to be overcome. Broadly, these are [1] the issues of ownership of the specifications, [2] the rights and conditions of use of the specification, and [3] the status of patents related to the specifications. Without clarity on these issues it is difficult for large organisations and government agencies to adopt the specifications. Formal standards organisations also may find it difficult to build on or include informal specifications as a part of formal standards for similar reasons.

    To overcome these issues the Open Web Foundation has been working on two major legal instruments to assist informal specification communities, based on the successful example of the Apache Software Foundation for enabling open source to be widely used in the commercial world.

    tags: standards

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.