Archive for November, 2008

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Links 11/26/2008

November 26, 2008

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Links 11/21/2008

November 21, 2008
  • Open is the buzzword of the moment. It was interesting to talk about “Open standards” at ApacheCon ‘08. I sat down with Whurley, David Recordon and the W3C’s Ted Guild to discuss what we could do to improve a number of issues.

    One of the things that really struck me is like most conversations about “Open” it means different things to different people. In the context of various standards bodies they use the term to mean drastically different things. In order to reset expectations I’d like to see a common set of terms we use to talk about this stuff. Interestingly David said that’s why the Open Web Foundation (OWF) choose to create “Specifications” rather than “Standards”. By avoiding the existing term they escape the implications that their specifications are mandatory or industrially definitive.

    tags: standards

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Links 11/20/2008

November 20, 2008

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Links 11/10/2008

November 10, 2008

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Links 11/04/2008

November 4, 2008
  • Software is increasingly embedded in society. Fewer and fewer solutions are stand-alone, hence interoperability amongst software from different vendors is crucial to governments, industry and the third sector. However, our research shows that achieving wide implementation does not only depend on the openness of the process, but also on the willingness to negotiate and achieve a compromise. We document the momentum of open standards in all sectors of society as illustrated by government policies, procurement and business practices and impacts on efficiency and effectiveness of public service delivery and business operations. Open standards achieve increasing momentum because standard setting actors – companies, governments, and consumers – are shifting from a dogmatic to a pragmatic perspective – from adherence to strict principles, to commitment to a path towards openness.

    tags: standards

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.