Archive for October, 2008

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Links 10/31/2008

October 31, 2008
  • Basically, Google has rewritten OpenID. Not only is it not exactly the same as the current OpenID protocol, it’s so different that existing OpenID relying parties won’t be able to use it. Only a handful of “partner sites” have been updated to understand Google’s perverted version of the OpenID standard, and anyone else hoping to authenticate via “OpenID” to Google’s servers will need to do the same.

    But OpenID is an open, community-based standard. Stabbing them in the back by creating an incompatible standard “based on” the same technology and masquerading under the same name isn’t the way to go. Google may have the best interests of decentralized authentication in mind, and perhaps even the better protocol to boot; but this is no way to prove a point.

    tags: standards

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Links 10/21/2008

October 21, 2008
  • Recently, the Electronic Frontier Foundation published an article entitled, “Why Hollywood Hates RealDVD,” whose basic claim is that Hollywood is anti-technology and innovation. It is disingenuous and wrongheaded to equate Hollywood’s efforts to prevent piracy with being against innovation. The market is full of high-tech, legal examples of Hollywood and the technology industry partnering to bring movies and television to consumers in new innovative ways.

    tags: standards

  • t can’t have thrilled the folks at Disney, who have worked so hard to establish Blu-ray Disc as the next-generation optical disc standard, to hear their largest shareholder call the format “a bag of hurt.”

    Asked last week why the new MacBook and MacBook Pro laptops lack Blu-ray drives, Apple chairman/CEO Steve Jobs said, “Blu-ray is just a bag of hurt. It’s great to watch the movies, but the licensing of the tech is so complex, we’re waiting till things settle down and Blu-ray takes off in the marketplace.”

    tags: standards

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Links 10/15/2008

October 15, 2008
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Links 10/08/2008

October 8, 2008
  • But the latest filing puts those arguments pretty squarely. If the case ever gets to a trial on the merits, the studios would likely be forced to confront head-on two related questions they have never previously wanted to see litigated. It makes you wonder whether they really thought this thing through before filing their lawsuit against Real. (Note: I’m not dealing here with the largely factual question of whether RealDVD performs a “circumvention” of CSS as defined by the CSS license agreement.)

    tags: standards

  • The suits at IBM are in a snit. According to the Wall Street Journal, the world’s largest computer company is threatening to pull out of certain international standards bodies because it has “become frustrated” by what it views as their “opaque processes and poor decision-making.” IBM’s press release on the subject is somewhat milder in tone, being a tree-hugging, planet-loving paean to the virtues of open standards and, just as important, open standards making processes. Who could object to that? However, beneath the velvet glove there lies a fist of some decidedly more ferrous material. IBM wants everyone to know that if it doesn’t like the quality of certain standards bodies’ work, it will lobby for changes in the way they operate, incite local governments to force them to reform, or even drop out of them altogether.

    tags: standards

  • It takes more than just imagination and hard work to put together a Blu-ray video disc. Outside of the usual authoring mechanics, content owners and publishers must not only make physical production decisions but also contend with numerous legal and financial obligations to the technology, patent, trademark, and other intellectual property holders.

    tags: standards

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Links 10/07/2008

October 7, 2008
  • One thing that should not be overlooked in the legal jousting between the MPAA and Real Networks over RealDVD is the degree to which the studios put themselves in the position they now find unacceptable. But for their own objections, they could have had a deal two years ago on a system to bring private, non-commercial copying of DVDs within the framework of the CSS licensing scheme, where they could have had some input over the how, when and where of the copying. Instead, they now find themselves suing a third-party technology developer for doing it without them.

    tags: standards

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Links 10/02/2008

October 2, 2008
  • The Real situation was taken up last week at a board meeting of the DVD-CCA. The discussion didn’t get very far, however, for reasons I won’t go into here, and the meeting ending without a decision being taken on whether DVD-CCA should take Real to court for violating the terms of the CSS license. With the appeal in the Kaleidescape case still pending, that was going to be a tough sell for the studios in any case. Under DVD-CCA’s bylaws it takes a vote of a majority of the board, plus at least one yea vote from each of the three industry groups represented: the studios, the consumer electronics companies and the IT industry. Even if all six of the studios voted yea, it would have taken at least one yea vote from the three CE companies on the board, plus one from the three IT companies.

    tags: standards